Challenges Facing Israel’s New Netanyahu Government – Part 2

Benjamin Netanyahu has once again ascended to the Prime Minister’s seat in the Israeli government. Many are thrilled to see him back in power, while most globalists shudder at the fact. Regardless of our opinions or anyone else’s, one thing is certain: the going will not be easy for Netanyahu for many reasons.

Yesterday we examined some of those reasons, and we’ll continue to look at potential pitfalls to a successful premiership today. Not only is PM Netanyahu facing pressure from those he just replaced in office, but the US administration isn’t exactly sitting tall in his camp either. But those aren’t the only challenges.

Will the New Government be Able to Handle the Iranian Threat without the Full Backing of the US?

Since the day Israel became a state, her enemies have threatened to destroy her.  Several attempts have utterly failed, but the greatest threat currently is Iran.  Leader after leader within the Persian empire have boldly proclaimed Iran’s intention: to wipe Israel off the map.

The difference between current and past threats is that Iran is certainly approaching nuclear capability, if not already there.  Experts believe they lack only the ability to mount such a warhead to a reliable missile to make a legitimate attempt to destroy Israel.

Recently, outgoing Defense Minister, Benny Gantz, indicated “time has come to place serious pressure” on Iran.  He urges the international community to step up and put pressure on Iran to give up its ambition for nuclear weapons, “before its too late.”

Add to that, the fact that Russia and Iran are openly working together in the war with Ukraine, and the threat becomes prophetically significant.  Iran is providing drones to Russia, while Russia promises military assistance to Iran, perhaps including the S-400 anti-aircraft system the Iranians hope will thwart any attack from Israel or the US.

With that, IDF Chief of General Staff, Lt Gen Aviv Kochavi, reports that the IDF “has eliminated Iran’s capacity to install the Hezbollah terror group in Syria,” and Israel’s ability to attack Iran’s nuclear facilities has “dramatically improved.” That’s somewhat good news, but definitely strikes a “war is coming” chord.

Such rhetoric means only one thing: tensions between Israel and Iran are growing daily, and Netanyahu is now tasked with defending Israel against sworn madmen whose ambition grows more evil day-by-day.

After Economically Outperforming Most of the World, Will Israel’s Economy Hold Up as Pressure Mounts?

On a positive note, Israel’s economy is now ranked the fourth strongest in the world!  It is believed inflation was less than 5% in 2022, and Israel’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP) grew at 5.8%.  Israel’s debt is also low, making it possible for them to fulfill Bible prophecy to “lend to many nations and borrow from none.”  Perhaps wise investors should consider investments in Israel!

But, will that strong economy hang on, and will Benjamin Netanyahu be able to parlay that into affordable housing?  Israel is consistently among the top 5 most expensive places to live. Costs of living have plagued Israelis for years and each Prime Minister promises to fix it.  Will Netanyahu be able to fulfill that promise, or will the vast majority of Israel’s economic resources go to bolster their military?

It is a fine line Netanyahu must walk.  Israel is a different place than when Netanyahu last sat in the PM’s chair less than 2 years ago.  Let’s pray he is able to manage these challenges while still keeping Israel safe, secure and prosperous.

Check back tomorrow as we finish off our 3-part series on the challenges of the new Netanyahu government in Israel.  See you then! 

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